Diana Romero

Associate Professor
Community Health and Social Sciences
Phone
(646) 364-9522
Office
802
Diana Romero is Associate Professor in the Department of Community Health and Social Sciences and director of the Maternal, Child, Reproductive and Sexual Health specialization (MCRSH) at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy in New York City.
Some of her recent projects include research on integration of reproductive health services in primary care, including the role of long-acting reversible contraception (LARC); safety-net health care utilization among uninsured immigrants in NYC; exploration of establishment of a wellness and prevention Trust in Brooklyn, NY; a qualitative study of East Harlem adolescents and their life goals in the context of personal relationships, risk of pregnancy and STIs; state analyses of welfare family cap policies; and a large-scale mixed-methods evaluation of a physician training program for advocacy around abortion and other reproductive health issues. Dr. Romero is a member of the NYC Department of Health advisory board for the CDC Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System (PRAMS), has served on the FDA Obstetrics and Gynecological Devices Advisory Panel, as well as on the Board of Directors of several non-profit research and advocacy organizations addressing reproduction, gender and health. She teaches graduate courses in research methods, community health, and reproductive and sexual health policy.
Degrees
PhD in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, New York, NY
MPhil in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, New York, NY
MA in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, New York, NY
MA in Scientific and Environmental Reporting from New York University, New York, NY
BA in Biology from New York University, New York, NY
Research Interests
Reproductive and sexual health and policy; social welfare policies related to the health of poor and low-income populations; racial/ethnic health disparities; health care access among underserved urban populations; program evaluation and mixed-methods study designs.
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