Using risk stratification to identify maternal and child health inequities in Togo

March 21, 2017 | Press Releases & Announcements

CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy doctoral student, Kate McCarthy, and Professor Heidi Jones have published “Identifying inequities in maternal and child health through risk stratification to inform health systems strengthening in Northern Togo.”

In northern Togo maternal and under five child mortality rates remain high.  The nongovernmental organization, Hope through Health, is collaborating with the Ministry of Health to strengthen clinic services and outreach to reduce maternal and child mortality in this area.  This study used a baseline population-based household survey of adults in the catchment areas of the four intervention clinics to stratify which subpopulations were accessing child health and prenatal and postnatal services.  In adjusted models, living less than 5 kilometers from a facility was the strongest predictor of giving birth at the facility in rural areas.  Women with high household wealth were more likely to receive a postnatal health check and to bring their children with fevers for malaria treatment than those with low household wealth.  One of the four areas, Kpindi, also had women accessing the fewest services.  These results are being used to inform and strengthen the intervention in these areas to reduce maternal and child mortality.

 

McCarthy KJ, Braganza S, Fiori K, Gbeleou C, Kpakpo V, Lopez A, et al. (2017) Identifying inequities in maternal and child health through risk stratification to inform health systems strengthening in Northern Togo. PLoS ONE 12(3): e0173445. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0173445