Dr. Echeverría is a social epidemiologist whose work connects two interrelated strands of research. First, using epidemiologic methods, she conducts studies promoting more nuanced understandings of how neighborhood contexts, poverty, and cultural and immigrant-related factors pattern physical activity, diabetes and smoking in Latinos and other racially/ ethnically diverse groups. She is leading several studies to determine how immigrant status and neighborhoods are associated with distinct modes of physical activity using cross-sectional and longitudinal study designs and applies interaction/ joint effects modeling approaches to address long-standing debates in ‘cultural’ vs. ‘structural’ explanations of Latino and immigrant health. She is also collaborating on studies examining the extent to which cell-phone only survey techniques reach more vulnerable segments of the population and how this may influence national estimates of key health indicators. The second strand of her research seeks to translate research evidence into applied, community engaged projects that can alleviate health inequities. She has dedicated the last few years of her career to work with community partners in designing and implementing a range of community interventions addressing cardiovascular risk. Her most recent work in this area includes designing a community-based physical activity intervention to improve diabetes outcomes in medically underserved Latinos, and she currently serves as the CUNY Principal Investigator (site PI) for the NYU-CUNY Prevention Research Center, a collaborative project between NYU and CUNY SPH examining medical-community linkages to reduce cardiovascular risk in immigrant populations.

 

Degrees

  • PhD in Epidemiology from Columbia University, New York, NY
  • MPH in Sociomedical Sciences from Columbia University, New York, NY

 

Research Interests

Social Determinants of Cardiovascular Health (physical activity, diabetes, smoking), Latino/ Immigrant Health, Community-Based Health Interventions

 

Affiliation